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Alabama in a box.

Knowing that there is a package from my family in transit always reminds of waiting on Christmas when I was little. It usually takes about a month and my dad is about ready to burst by the time it gets here.

Each box has things that I've mentioned would be good to have. This particular box asked for a Bible, some corn starch (to make really fun gooey stuff with my kids), some vitamins for some of the children I know here and some seeds to plant in our tiny balcony garden. Aside from that I knew some other things that would be in there but the rest were surprises.

I was surprised when I opened it and found 2 of my favorite dresses, my chacos, a new really cool pair of sneakers from my sister, muffin mixes, honey roasted crunchy peanut butter, GRAVY mix and bacon...a plethora of the kind of bacon you find that's already pre-cooked. There was also some mail...an Auburn Alum brochure (sad) and a letter from my compassion child, Wilber that he signed himself!

I think I must have nearly cried when I opened. It seemed as if Alabama was bursting from every corner of the box. I awoke this morning with great enthusiasm to make some homemade biscuits with gravy and bacon! A treat, for sure.

Erin and I are about to make a trip to the black market and I plan on wearing my chacos. When I got them out of the box, the bottoms had all kinds of mud and dirt stuck to them. I was never happier to see Alabama dirt.

My parents did an excellent job and I'd be pretty satisfied if I didn't get any more packages while I'm here. But, knowing them, they've already started gathering little surprises for the next package.

It's great to be loved and it's great to receive Alabama in a box--half way around the world (literally).

Comments

  1. love it love it love it :) :)
    and love you too :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. I forgot to say that I got this really cool bag from my grandpa that was made my women in Nepal.

    ReplyDelete

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